Skepticism is healthy.
Get into it.

comedycentral:

Everyone’s going to be walking and talking about this Aaron Sorkin parody from tonight’s new Inside Amy Schumer.

comedycentral:

Everyone’s going to be walking and talking about this Aaron Sorkin parody from tonight’s new Inside Amy Schumer.

(Source: vh1, via jesusismyhostage)

section9:

grayblue:

theboondockstv:

Top Boondocks Quotes #12 (Season 1, Episode 1)

'white people love cheese'

It’s true. White people love cheese. White people love cheese so much, they make cheese out of stuff that doesn’t make cheese so they can trick themselves into thinking they’re eating cheese.

you’ll appreciate this - http://instagram.com/p/mu-9FvhfSG/

section9:

grayblue:

theboondockstv:

Top Boondocks Quotes #12 (Season 1, Episode 1)

'white people love cheese'

It’s true. White people love cheese. White people love cheese so much, they make cheese out of stuff that doesn’t make cheese so they can trick themselves into thinking they’re eating cheese.

you’ll appreciate this - http://instagram.com/p/mu-9FvhfSG/

kenyatta:

flatluigi:

stormingtheivory:

So can we talk about the absolutely stunning duplicity going on here?

holy shit

How to lie with statistics: Death In Florida version
btw, a clearer version of this graph is here:


jesus fucking christ. 

kenyatta:

flatluigi:

stormingtheivory:

So can we talk about the absolutely stunning duplicity going on here?

holy shit

How to lie with statistics: Death In Florida version

btw, a clearer version of this graph is here:

image

jesus fucking christ. 

theboondockstv:

Top Boondocks Quotes #12 (Season 1, Episode 1)

'white people love cheese'

theboondockstv:

Top Boondocks Quotes #12 (Season 1, Episode 1)

'white people love cheese'

petervidani:

sweendawg:

worst wheel of fortune contestant ever

:(

[not] proud to be an IU grad…

(Source: youtube.com)

Yahoo Changes May Affect Your Deliverability | MailChimp Email Marketing Blog

beerburritowhiskey:

Well, this has certain been making my day a little more challenging.

THANK GOD. my account was brute-force hacked a NUMBER of times, and even after killing off the account, it’s been spoofed and sending spam to my [old] contact lists, and showing as not spam. WAY TO FINALLY GET YOUR EMAIL SHIT TOGETHER YAHOO. 

jesusismyhostage:

Take me to the hospital, I’m sick!

(Source: erics-idle)

i have to believe that @buzzfeed did this on purpose.
Saturday.

has anyone else had issues with the mavericks update completely borking their macbook? 

ninehundredfour asked: what are you drinking tonight?

beerburritowhiskey:

adulthoodisokay:

buzzfeed:

It’s either going to be

or

Guess who’s running BuzzFeed’s tumblr?

:D

top for the win

(Source: generic-art, via jesusismyhostage)

drinkdistiller:

Sourcing The Sources // Where does it all come from?
It’s understood amongst most professionals in the world of whiskey that many expressions, whether it be a Scottish Highland Malt, a Peated Irish, or a Straight Bourbon, may source their juice from another – sometimes many other – distiller(s). Indeed, it’s a relatively common practice within the industry – but one the consumer, more often than not, isn’t aware is taking place.
In Scotland (and the UK as a whole), it’s completely commonplace, and there are shops and brands who will invite you eagerly to make your own blends of various malts.
But here in America, where the ‘craft’ spirit industry is taking off hard and fast, there can often be a lack of clarity as to where exactly your whiskey is coming from. In his piece at Askmen, Robert Haynes-Peterson attempts a deeper dive into the source of the juice and what can define a ‘craft’ spirit in this growing market. Where larger brands have a high barrier to entry when creating a new expression from a business standpoint, the smaller, more startup-like brands can move more quickly to adapt, blend, and create something new –

"I think there are three kinds of craft distillers," says distillery consultant David Pickerell. "The people who build their own equipment and start from ground zero, the people who make their own products from scratch, and the people who are third-party merchants, starting with something someone else made, adding something of their own, then marketing the living daylights out of it. All three are craft, but all three are different."

It’s a fascinating read, really – whether you’re well aware or new to the practice. There is one point in the piece that truly strikes home though, as made by Mr. Pickerell (also quoted above) – “There are people who cry foul… But I ask again, ‘Do you like it?’”
As the whiskey market continues to boom, and brands search for new expressions and blends and labels to create this practice will certainly continue. So focus on the one thing that really matters in the whole process of whiskey discovery – Do you like it?
Source: The Truth About Craft Spirits [Robert Haynes-Peterson // Askmen.com]
Image: Whisky Barrels [Wikimedia Commons]

drinkdistiller:

Sourcing The Sources // Where does it all come from?

It’s understood amongst most professionals in the world of whiskey that many expressions, whether it be a Scottish Highland Malt, a Peated Irish, or a Straight Bourbon, may source their juice from another – sometimes many other – distiller(s). Indeed, it’s a relatively common practice within the industry – but one the consumer, more often than not, isn’t aware is taking place.

In Scotland (and the UK as a whole), it’s completely commonplace, and there are shops and brands who will invite you eagerly to make your own blends of various malts.

But here in America, where the ‘craft’ spirit industry is taking off hard and fast, there can often be a lack of clarity as to where exactly your whiskey is coming from. In his piece at Askmen, Robert Haynes-Peterson attempts a deeper dive into the source of the juice and what can define a ‘craft’ spirit in this growing market. Where larger brands have a high barrier to entry when creating a new expression from a business standpoint, the smaller, more startup-like brands can move more quickly to adapt, blend, and create something new –

"I think there are three kinds of craft distillers," says distillery consultant David Pickerell. "The people who build their own equipment and start from ground zero, the people who make their own products from scratch, and the people who are third-party merchants, starting with something someone else made, adding something of their own, then marketing the living daylights out of it. All three are craft, but all three are different."

It’s a fascinating read, really – whether you’re well aware or new to the practice. There is one point in the piece that truly strikes home though, as made by Mr. Pickerell (also quoted above) – “There are people who cry foul… But I ask again, ‘Do you like it?’”

As the whiskey market continues to boom, and brands search for new expressions and blends and labels to create this practice will certainly continue. So focus on the one thing that really matters in the whole process of whiskey discovery – Do you like it?

Source: The Truth About Craft Spirits [Robert Haynes-Peterson // Askmen.com]

Image: Whisky Barrels [Wikimedia Commons]