Skepticism is healthy.
Get into it.

fatmanatee:

oh no

my dreams have been shattered.

fatmanatee:

oh no

my dreams have been shattered.

nevver:

Batman forever stamps

i don’t even send mail. but i’m gonna get these…

(via nevver)

(Source: grugz, via liannakristine)

that’s a lot of jeans and sweaters.

that’s a lot of jeans and sweaters.

(Source: ell-h)

ello?

drinkdistiller:

LET’S TALK ABOUT PEAT // THE GREAT SMOKY DIVIDE
This week on The Mash Bill, beloved Tasting Table member and editor of Alcoholprofessor.com, Amanda Schuster delves into the peat - those who love it, those who hate it, and keeping an open mind…
Whisky enthusiasts agree on many things, but they love to argue about peat smoke. As chili peppers are to spicy food, peat is to whisky. Just as people boast of their tolerance for hot peppers in, say a bowl of chili or a fiery vindaloo, whisky drinkers and producers enjoy out-peating each other. All the while other whisky connoisseurs prefer their unsmoked dram, thank you very much. Many whisky fans enjoy both, of course. But they will always inevitably meet the staunch defenders of both sides of the smoke line.
Why is peat in the whisky in the first place?
Peat is a type of soil consisting of partially decayed vegetable matter, found in wet, boggy areas known as ‘peatlands’ or ‘mires.’ The predominant component of it is a type of moss called Sphagnum, which gives it that characteristic, sort of rubbery smell, especially when burned. Dried peat has been used as an effective fuel and heat source in place of wood for centuries, particularly in Ireland, Scotland, England and Russia.
Two of the biggest misconceptions for novice whisky drinkers is that all Scotch is peated, and that it’s only found in Scotch. Peat comes into whisky production as the fuel source for drying barley or other grains (but mostly barley) for malting. However, the grains can be dried without the use of peat, either simply by letting them air dry, which takes quite a long time, or using unpeated fuel such as certain types of wood.
Furthermore, not all peated whisky is the same. You might have rolled your eyes a few times hearing a wine enthusiast use the term terroir to describe the differences between grape varieties in different regions and how that affects the characteristics of specific wines. The same holds true for whisky. Aside from the type of oak used to age a whisky, the other factors that shape the flavors of whisky are the water source, the soil and how the grain was processed, i.e. whether it was peated, which, by the way, is not restricted to Scotland, although that is where the style is most prevalent.
The Islay region of Scotland is known for a particularly fierce style of peated whisky, and this is the variation that earned peated whisky its reputation, with devoted fans and those with a searing intolerance. Thanks to the tempestuous weather conditions and proximity to the sea, Islay whiskies such as Lagavulin, Laphroaig, Bowmore, Ardbeg and Caol Ila tend to taste like the fiery aftermath of a maritime battle, sometimes with rather pronounced elements of seaweed, brine, fish oil, iodine and rubber tire. (One of the more hilarious descriptions of Laphroaig found in their “Opinions Welcome” campaign is that it tastes like “burning hospital.”)
In the Highlands and other parts of Scotland, if used in production (there are many who don’t), the peat, which is found farther inland, lends more of a rich, sweet smoke, more reminiscent of pipe tobacco and even smoked or barbecued meat. Some of the peated Highland malts to look out for are Oban, Benriach, Benromach, Old Pulteney and Clynelish. Highland Park from Orkney has a very subtle charcoal smokiness, while Talisker from the Isle of Skye uses peat smoke as a more dominant element.
Even some distilleries and regions who are known for peat-free maltings release peated expressions. Irish whiskey is traditionally unpeated, but now producers such as Connemara are going peat crazy. The English Whisky Company has peated and non peated styles. Any Glen Garioch Scotch that is older than 1995 hails back to a time they used peated malt, and they are now releasing bottlings such as the 1994 as a peat-nostalgic time capsule. Bruichladdich also reopened as a mostly peat-free distillery, yet you wouldn’t guess it after tasting the Port Charlotte releases. And let’s not leave out the blended Scotches that use peaty single malts for everything from gentle flavor enhancements (Johnnie Walker Black) to creating big in your face expressions like Compass Box Peat Monster.
Single malt whisky production is catching on outside the UK and Ireland too, even in nations that don’t use peat as an everyday heating source. McCarthy’s out of Oregon uses peated barley sourced from Scotland to produce single malt whisky on American shores. Corsair Triple Smoke incorporates peat-smoked barley with cherry wood and beechwood smoked barleys for just a waft of peaty funk. Indian whisky company Amrut is also in on the peat game. Peated Japanese whiskies are of course a thing too.
So just because you might have tried a peated whisky and not fallen madly in love, it’s worth tasting others. It’s like saying you don’t like Chardonnay because it’s too “oaky.” No. Oak is oaky. Peat is peaty. It’s all in how a producer chooses to showcase it and which one works with your palate. And you can’t argue that.

drinkdistiller:

LET’S TALK ABOUT PEAT // THE GREAT SMOKY DIVIDE

This week on The Mash Bill, beloved Tasting Table member and editor of Alcoholprofessor.com, Amanda Schuster delves into the peat - those who love it, those who hate it, and keeping an open mind…

Whisky enthusiasts agree on many things, but they love to argue about peat smoke. As chili peppers are to spicy food, peat is to whisky. Just as people boast of their tolerance for hot peppers in, say a bowl of chili or a fiery vindaloo, whisky drinkers and producers enjoy out-peating each other. All the while other whisky connoisseurs prefer their unsmoked dram, thank you very much. Many whisky fans enjoy both, of course. But they will always inevitably meet the staunch defenders of both sides of the smoke line.

Why is peat in the whisky in the first place?

Peat is a type of soil consisting of partially decayed vegetable matter, found in wet, boggy areas known as ‘peatlands’ or ‘mires.’ The predominant component of it is a type of moss called Sphagnum, which gives it that characteristic, sort of rubbery smell, especially when burned. Dried peat has been used as an effective fuel and heat source in place of wood for centuries, particularly in Ireland, Scotland, England and Russia.

Two of the biggest misconceptions for novice whisky drinkers is that all Scotch is peated, and that it’s only found in Scotch. Peat comes into whisky production as the fuel source for drying barley or other grains (but mostly barley) for malting. However, the grains can be dried without the use of peat, either simply by letting them air dry, which takes quite a long time, or using unpeated fuel such as certain types of wood.

Furthermore, not all peated whisky is the same. You might have rolled your eyes a few times hearing a wine enthusiast use the term terroir to describe the differences between grape varieties in different regions and how that affects the characteristics of specific wines. The same holds true for whisky. Aside from the type of oak used to age a whisky, the other factors that shape the flavors of whisky are the water source, the soil and how the grain was processed, i.e. whether it was peated, which, by the way, is not restricted to Scotland, although that is where the style is most prevalent.

The Islay region of Scotland is known for a particularly fierce style of peated whisky, and this is the variation that earned peated whisky its reputation, with devoted fans and those with a searing intolerance. Thanks to the tempestuous weather conditions and proximity to the sea, Islay whiskies such as Lagavulin, Laphroaig, Bowmore, Ardbeg and Caol Ila tend to taste like the fiery aftermath of a maritime battle, sometimes with rather pronounced elements of seaweed, brine, fish oil, iodine and rubber tire. (One of the more hilarious descriptions of Laphroaig found in their “Opinions Welcome” campaign is that it tastes like “burning hospital.”)

In the Highlands and other parts of Scotland, if used in production (there are many who don’t), the peat, which is found farther inland, lends more of a rich, sweet smoke, more reminiscent of pipe tobacco and even smoked or barbecued meat. Some of the peated Highland malts to look out for are Oban, Benriach, Benromach, Old Pulteney and Clynelish. Highland Park from Orkney has a very subtle charcoal smokiness, while Talisker from the Isle of Skye uses peat smoke as a more dominant element.

Even some distilleries and regions who are known for peat-free maltings release peated expressions. Irish whiskey is traditionally unpeated, but now producers such as Connemara are going peat crazy. The English Whisky Company has peated and non peated styles. Any Glen Garioch Scotch that is older than 1995 hails back to a time they used peated malt, and they are now releasing bottlings such as the 1994 as a peat-nostalgic time capsule. Bruichladdich also reopened as a mostly peat-free distillery, yet you wouldn’t guess it after tasting the Port Charlotte releases. And let’s not leave out the blended Scotches that use peaty single malts for everything from gentle flavor enhancements (Johnnie Walker Black) to creating big in your face expressions like Compass Box Peat Monster.

Single malt whisky production is catching on outside the UK and Ireland too, even in nations that don’t use peat as an everyday heating source. McCarthy’s out of Oregon uses peated barley sourced from Scotland to produce single malt whisky on American shores. Corsair Triple Smoke incorporates peat-smoked barley with cherry wood and beechwood smoked barleys for just a waft of peaty funk. Indian whisky company Amrut is also in on the peat game. Peated Japanese whiskies are of course a thing too.

So just because you might have tried a peated whisky and not fallen madly in love, it’s worth tasting others. It’s like saying you don’t like Chardonnay because it’s too “oaky.” No. Oak is oaky. Peat is peaty. It’s all in how a producer chooses to showcase it and which one works with your palate. And you can’t argue that.

it’s all smooth sailing from here on out….

putthison:

Flotsam General Store: “Our Aesthetic Will Punch You in the Face”
If you, like me, are interested in things, Flotsam General Store (a new webshop from comedians Eugene Mirman and H. Jon Benjamin) looks promising: things, designed/chosen by them, shipped to you in a sack. It’s a retail concept Mirman and Benjamin have been considering for 20 years. Said Mirman: “People will often say to us, ‘If you weren’t doing comedy or acting, what would you do?’ And I always say ‘I’d be an entrepreneur of mysterious bags.’”
If you’re skeptical of the site, which promises “a post-structural online shopping experience,” you shouldn’t be. “It is definitely real, and the products are real, and the bag is real, and everyone who orders one will get one.”
What You’ll Get
Regarding what you’ll get in your sack: It’s not easy to pin Mirman and Benjamin down at this stage. They know that the initial customers will likely be fans of their comedy work, but they want their designs to stand on their own. “We’re entering the design world, naked as a baby,” said Benjamin. “It’s not going to be, like, a Bob’s Burgers mustache.” According to Mirman, it could be made of forged steel, but it’s not a Toyota Corolla. They won’t rule anything out, although there are no wood projects currently in the works. Some of the items will be wearable. Probably.
The small mystery sack ($40) will contain approximately three items. The larger sacks, currently delayed due to manufacturing lead times, will have more. Said Mirman: “The things that will come in the bag will be somewhere between useful and interesting. People are like ‘Oh, I hope it’s a bag of sand.’ No you don’t, and neither do we want to send you sand.” What will the items be useful for? “Take it to a bar and start a party. Or a fight!” According to Benjamin, they will be “products that will leave a legacy. Something to be proud of for time immemorial.”
Once the sacks start to ship (the site launched Monday), there will be no keeping the mystery products under wraps, and the curators know that. “We aren’t sending a nondisclosure agreement as one of the three items,” said Mirman. But the bag contents will change—“like flotsam, the word”—so what one guy Instagrams won’t necessarily reflect what you’ll get if you order. Once the stuff is out there, Flotsam may offer customer favorites for sale on an individual basis, but they plan on continuing the sack sale model: “Mystery bags forever.”
The Future of Flotsam
If all goes well,  Flotsam is considering launching brick and mortar stores, following a traditional path: first New York, then Tokyo, then probably Massachusetts. It’s Benjamin’s goal for Flotsam to be as big as Starbucks. Eventually “in their coffee.” For the skeptical consumer, why trust two actors with $40 to deliver on their promise of good stuff? “$40 is not a big consumer risk,” said Mirman. Added Benjamin, “Look at Maurice McDonald, who started McDonald’s. He had $40, and look what happened.” Plus, shipping is free.
http://www.flotsamgeneralstore.com/
-Pete

sold.

putthison:

Flotsam General Store: “Our Aesthetic Will Punch You in the Face”

If you, like me, are interested in things, Flotsam General Store (a new webshop from comedians Eugene Mirman and H. Jon Benjamin) looks promising: things, designed/chosen by them, shipped to you in a sack. It’s a retail concept Mirman and Benjamin have been considering for 20 years. Said Mirman: “People will often say to us, ‘If you weren’t doing comedy or acting, what would you do?’ And I always say ‘I’d be an entrepreneur of mysterious bags.’”

If you’re skeptical of the site, which promises “a post-structural online shopping experience,” you shouldn’t be. “It is definitely real, and the products are real, and the bag is real, and everyone who orders one will get one.”

What You’ll Get

Regarding what you’ll get in your sack: It’s not easy to pin Mirman and Benjamin down at this stage. They know that the initial customers will likely be fans of their comedy work, but they want their designs to stand on their own. “We’re entering the design world, naked as a baby,” said Benjamin. “It’s not going to be, like, a Bob’s Burgers mustache.” According to Mirman, it could be made of forged steel, but it’s not a Toyota Corolla. They won’t rule anything out, although there are no wood projects currently in the works. Some of the items will be wearable. Probably.

The small mystery sack ($40) will contain approximately three items. The larger sacks, currently delayed due to manufacturing lead times, will have more. Said Mirman: “The things that will come in the bag will be somewhere between useful and interesting. People are like ‘Oh, I hope it’s a bag of sand.’ No you don’t, and neither do we want to send you sand.” What will the items be useful for? “Take it to a bar and start a party. Or a fight!” According to Benjamin, they will be “products that will leave a legacy. Something to be proud of for time immemorial.”

Once the sacks start to ship (the site launched Monday), there will be no keeping the mystery products under wraps, and the curators know that. “We aren’t sending a nondisclosure agreement as one of the three items,” said Mirman. But the bag contents will change—“like flotsam, the word”—so what one guy Instagrams won’t necessarily reflect what you’ll get if you order. Once the stuff is out there, Flotsam may offer customer favorites for sale on an individual basis, but they plan on continuing the sack sale model: “Mystery bags forever.”

The Future of Flotsam

If all goes well,  Flotsam is considering launching brick and mortar stores, following a traditional path: first New York, then Tokyo, then probably Massachusetts. It’s Benjamin’s goal for Flotsam to be as big as Starbucks. Eventually “in their coffee.” For the skeptical consumer, why trust two actors with $40 to deliver on their promise of good stuff? “$40 is not a big consumer risk,” said Mirman. Added Benjamin, “Look at Maurice McDonald, who started McDonald’s. He had $40, and look what happened.” Plus, shipping is free.

http://www.flotsamgeneralstore.com/

-Pete

sold.

(via hodgman)

johnessex:

tastefullyoffensive:

[via]

Bruh.

winner.

johnessex:

tastefullyoffensive:

[via]

Bruh.

winner.

(Source: tastefullyoffensive, via marlene)

“The frightening thing is that, like most of their other campaigns against women, they see themselves as just warriors fighting for what’s right. This is primarily because they firmly believe that any woman who speaks up on women’s issues is completely disingenuous and only doing it for the purposes of self-promotion, and that any man who does is looking to get laid, because they actually cannot possibly imagine a scenario in which someone would genuinely give a shit about women.
 
Members of this board, as well as “Men’s Rights Activists” in general, tend to go apoplectic at even the most mild implications that women might be human beings. For them, this is simply “not allowed” and must be punished swiftly and severely, as they appear to believe that feminism is the one obstacle in the way of all these pathetic neckbeards getting their pick of supermodel girlfriends who obey their every whim. The goal is to make it as uncomfortable to speak out about misogyny and women’s issues as possible, which is why they go to the wall in terms of harassing women like Emma Watson. At the end of the day, this is the crux of it. It would be sad if it weren’t so vile.”

—   

Emma Watson threatened with nude photo leak over UN speech on gender equality

Because of course she was.

(via wilwheaton)

for fuck’s sake. the sheer insanity of these “men’s rights” dweebs kills me. yeah man, feminism is why it’s so hard for you to find someone. that’s what’s doing it. totally.

(via wilwheaton)

kenyatta:

tacanderson:

Swatch is about to commit two classic, large company, innovation mistakes. 
This is just classic. According to reports, Swatch has just banned the work on smartwatches. 
Swatch Group Head Nicolas Hayek Jr. Is Putting Smartwatches In The “No Fly Zone”

A source said that Swatch Group head Nicolas Hayek Jr., son of the late SG CEO Nicolas Hayek, is adamant that the company would not be pursuing smartwatches inside Swatch itself or within any of the many Swatch brands. The source said that Hayek Jr. felt “burned” by a 2004-2005 MSN SPOT watch partnership that fizzled and is avoiding mention of smart watches in general.
“He commented that he saw no future in these smart watches and that Swatch Group would stay out of it,” the source said.

Because this guy (bellow), the founder’s son, the current CEO, one of the richest people in the World, doesn’t like smartwatches. 

Because Swatch tried making smartwatches, way before the market was ready, and it didn’t work. 
I have seen both of these problems before. Leadership doesn’t get the new technology, and a large company is unwilling to risk making the same mistake twice. IBM, HP, Microsoft, RIM/Blackberry, and many other current companies, and hundreds of tech companies that no longer exist, have all made these mistakes before. 
What if Apple decided they didn’t want to make smart phones again after the failure of the Apple Newton? 
At some point, Swatch will have to eat crow and change strategy or slowly dwindle into irrelevance. Already their stock has dropped from almost $600 a share to $487 a share currently. I’m sure ignoring smartwatches is going to help. This is a business school, case study waiting to happen. 

It’s fascinating, seeing people make the same mistakes others made before them.

see ya later swatch. for a company so rooted in schtick-y, design-focused timepieces, this is just… laughable. (also, MSN? failure? JESUS I’M AGHAST.)

kenyatta:

tacanderson:

Swatch is about to commit two classic, large company, innovation mistakes. 

This is just classic. According to reports, Swatch has just banned the work on smartwatches. 

Swatch Group Head Nicolas Hayek Jr. Is Putting Smartwatches In The “No Fly Zone”

A source said that Swatch Group head Nicolas Hayek Jr., son of the late SG CEO Nicolas Hayek, is adamant that the company would not be pursuing smartwatches inside Swatch itself or within any of the many Swatch brands. The source said that Hayek Jr. felt “burned” by a 2004-2005 MSN SPOT watch partnership that fizzled and is avoiding mention of smart watches in general.

“He commented that he saw no future in these smart watches and that Swatch Group would stay out of it,” the source said.

Because this guy (bellow), the founder’s son, the current CEO, one of the richest people in the World, doesn’t like smartwatches. 

Because Swatch tried making smartwatches, way before the market was ready, and it didn’t work. 

I have seen both of these problems before. Leadership doesn’t get the new technology, and a large company is unwilling to risk making the same mistake twice. IBM, HP, Microsoft, RIM/Blackberry, and many other current companies, and hundreds of tech companies that no longer exist, have all made these mistakes before. 

What if Apple decided they didn’t want to make smart phones again after the failure of the Apple Newton? 

At some point, Swatch will have to eat crow and change strategy or slowly dwindle into irrelevance. Already their stock has dropped from almost $600 a share to $487 a share currently. I’m sure ignoring smartwatches is going to help. This is a business school, case study waiting to happen. 

It’s fascinating, seeing people make the same mistakes others made before them.

see ya later swatch. for a company so rooted in schtick-y, design-focused timepieces, this is just… laughable. (also, MSN? failure? JESUS I’M AGHAST.)

what he said.

(Source: theaudacityofswope, via theaudacityofswope)

Why is Microsoft buying Minecraft?

Here’s the deal. Microsoft’s purchase of minecraft actually has VERY little to do with this ‘analysis’ banking off app purchases and blah blah blah. 

This is about shift cultures and maintaining their usefulness. Microsoft, over their continued series of failures, is desperate to re-implant themselves in the day to day life of a newer generation. The windows 8 kernel mass adoption via pc, phone, surface, and xbone has already been nothing short of a failure, though they still refuse to admit it. it’s all out in the open - missed sales goals, constant slashing of prices across all devices in attempt to compete and force adoption, naming the phone’s assistant ‘cortana’ in a meager attempt to recapture the loss of the insane money maker that was halo/xbox/360, even the recent announcement of a new tablet keyboard to work with ios & android devices - microsoft needs to get back into your (data)life like a shitty obsessed ex. 

the big problem - google and apple (and samsung and sony) have already won all of the current major consumer generations. google’s free apps have already all but destroyed outlook, hotmail, msn messenger, and they’re on-track to render office obsolete (for the average consumer). ps4 has already outpaced xbone to insane levels, and the xbone/msoft/surface/nfl partnership was… was a misplaced assumption of what ‘could’ drive sales on the part of both parties.  

microsoft HAS to find a way to get users back on board and data-mineable in the new technological landscape where the tech can be handed out for free so that user data can be mined for ads. that was their hope with the w8 kernel running across all platforms, and a new model of in-life (for lack of a better term) ad network (a sneaky, almost never talked about thing that was a major piece of w8). adoption simply hasn’t been there. 

purchasing minecraft isn’t about app sales, it’s about catching a new generation while they’re young, and trying to re-insert themselves into day to day life for the next gen of consumers. 

But, they may very well be failing to account for generalized shifts that include a lack of brand loyalty or even attention span. 

this isn’t about fiscal 2015 - this is about the next decade+ of microsoft and whether or not they can retain relevance in the consumer market.

Time’s gonna tell.

dngrm:

Oh, and we’re hiring.
http://www.tumblr.com/jobs

So Tumblr staff likes whiskey? and here i am… with this and this…

dngrm:

Oh, and we’re hiring.

http://www.tumblr.com/jobs

So Tumblr staff likes whiskey? and here i am… with this and this